Mar 30, 2020  
2019-2020 University Catalog 
    
2019-2020 University Catalog

General Education Program


The Cal Poly Pomona (CPP) General Education (GE) requirements have been designed to complement the major program and electives completed by each baccalaureate candidate to ensure that graduates have made noteworthy progress toward becoming broadly educated persons who will function as intelligent, active, and creative members of their community.

The CPP GE program purposefully introduces students to a wide variety of disciplines and teaching modes that may be taught in all modalities. The CPP GE program mission is designed to help students to succeed in their chosen field, adapt to a changing workplace, be engaged citizens in their communities, and become lifelong learners. It provides essential skills and knowledge through a framework that enhances students' understanding of basic disciplines and encourages an appreciation of the complexity of all knowledge.

GE courses provide students with a broad intellectual foundation to enhance their potential for success. GE courses shall reflect the wide array of disciplines available, and departments are encouraged to submit courses for multiple GE areas. In recognition of the complexity of knowledge, these areas are defined with open and inclusive terms to encourage submission of courses that enrich the student learning experience. Departments are required to offer these courses at least once every five years, otherwise they will lose their GE designation.

As directed by EO 1100, the GE Assessment Committee develops a set of broad learning outcomes (SLOs) for the GE Program as a whole "to fit within the framework of the four Essential Learning Outcomes drawn from the Liberal Education and America's Promise (LEAP) campaign. As a result, there is not a one-to-one mapping from the outcomes to the GE Areas. Every course must address all of the SLOs assigned to the GE Area for which it is approved. However, approved courses need not cover every element of those SLOs. The GE Assessment Committee also develops an assessment plan as recommended by EO 1100 article 6.2.5 and a periodic program review of the GE program shall be undertaken in a manner comparable to major programs. The GE Committee in collaboration with the GE Assessment Committee shall have the responsibility

Minimum Grades in General Education

Effective for new and returning students admitted fall 2015 or later, a grade of C- or better is required of each Cal Poly Pomona or transfer student completing courses in written communication in the English language (GE Sub-area A2), oral communication in the English language (GE Sub-area A1), critical thinking (GE Sub-area A3), and mathematics/quantitative reasoning (GE Sub-area B4).

General Education - Approved Coursework

Courses are approved by the Campus Academic Senate by area to meet the university general education program requirements. Coursework in General Education should not be taken without a specific curricular goal. Many degree programs recommend specific GE courses which also meet their degree requirements. Such departments will list these courses in their degree curriculum layouts and in their catalog section. Special Topics courses (those numbered 4990) are not eligible for GE credit. Students should consult with advisors in their major department. Undeclared students should consult with the staff of the Bronco Advising Center, Student Services Building, 1st Floor (Blue Counter).

The framework, guidelines, and coursework approved to meet general education requirements may change subsequent to the publication of this catalog. Students who change majors or otherwise have a break in status may find that they are subject to new degree requirements. Careful academic and career planning is essential.

Cal Poly Pomona offers students two curriculum patterns to satisfy GE requirements. In the University General Education pattern, which is open to all undergraduates, students select courses in five areas: English Language Communication and Critical Thinking, Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning, Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences, and Lifelong Learning and Self-development. The University General Education pattern gives students an introduction to a wide variety of disciplines and teaching modes.

Students must complete a minimum of nine semester units of upper division general education which may be taken no sooner than the semester in which the student achieves upper division status. Nine semester units of the total general education program must be completed in residence at Cal Poly Pomona.

Courses listed as a sequence should be taken in order. For example, in the sequence MAT 1140 -MAT 1150 , MAT 1140  should be completed before taking MAT 1150 . Each course in the sequence counts as one course toward meeting general education requirements.

Questions related to general education requirements should be directed to the Office of Undergraduate Studies and General Education, Building 121.

General Education Unit Distribution

Beginning fall 2018 all undergraduate students at Cal Poly Pomona must satisfy the general education requirements with a minimum and a maximum of 48 semester units, including 9 units of upper division synthesis courses. Lower division courses only shall be approved for the lower division GE Areas (The 9 upper division units shall be taken within the CSU to fulfill the CSU residency requirement.) EO 1100 2.2.2a says that a grade of C- (minus) or better is required in the "golden four' courses A1, A2, A3 and B4. In 2.2.5a EO 1100 says that a campus may waive one or more of the requirements of Title 5 and that the campus must have a clearly stated policy regarding such waivers. Courses are evaluated by a duly constituted GE Committee (which shall include a student representative) and are approved by the Academic Senate to meet the university general education program requirements. Since general education is under continual review, the framework, guidelines, and coursework approved to meet these requirements may change from one catalog cycle to another. Students who change majors or have a break in status may be subject to new degree requirements. Careful academic advising is essential. According to EO 1100, 2.2.6.1 major courses and campus wide required courses that are approved for GE credit shall also fulfill (double count for) the GE requirements. Many degree programs recommend specific GE courses which also meet degree requirements (double counting). Departments must indicate those courses on the curriculum sheet of each program.

Area A. English Language Communication and Critical Thinking (9 units)

At least 3 units from each sub-area

1. Oral Communication
2. Written Communication
3. Critical Thinking

Area B. Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning (12 units)

At least 3 units from B1, B2, B4, and B5 including 1 unit of lab from B1 or B2 to fulfill B3

1. Physical Sciences
2. Life Sciences
3. Laboratory Activity
4. Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning
5. Science and Technology Synthesis (upper division)

Area C. Arts and Humanities (12 units)

At least 3 units from each sub-area and 3 additional units from sub-area 1 and/or 2

1. Visual and Performing Arts
2. Literature, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Civilization
3. Arts and Humanities Synthesis (upper division)

Area D. Social Sciences (12 units)

At least 3 units from each sub-area

1. U.S. History American Ideals
2. U.S. Constitution and California Government
3. Social Sciences: Principles, Methodologies, Value Systems, and Ethics
4. Social Science Synthesis (upper division)

Area E. Lifelong Learning and Self-Development (3 units)

General Education Areas

The notations after each subarea are the General Education Learning Outcomes aligned with that subarea.

Goals and Measurable Outcomes

I. Acquire foundational skills and capacities.               

  1. Write effectively to various audiences.
  2. Speak effectively to various audiences.
  3. Find, locate, evaluate, use, and share information effectively and ethically.
  4. Construct arguments based on sound evidence and reasoning to support an opinion or conclusion.   
  5. Apply and communicate quantitative arguments using equation and graphical representations of data.

II. Develop an understanding of various branches of knowledge and their interrelationships.

  1. Apply scientific methods and models to draw quantitative and qualitative conclusions about the physical and natural world.
  2. Analyze major literary, philosophical, historical, or artistic works and explain their significance in society.
  3. Analyze concepts, research methods and theories pertaining to the study of culture, economics, history, politics, or society.
  4. Integrate concepts, examples, and theories from more than one discipline to identify problems, construct original ideas, and draw conclusions.

III. Develop social and global knowledge.

  1. Analyze the historical development of diverse cultures and the role they play in shaping core institutions and practices of individuals and societies.
  2. Analyze principles, methods, value systems, and ethics to social issues confronting local and global communities.

IV. Develop capacities for continued development and lifelong learning. 

  1. Analyze the factors that contribute to individual well-being (such as physical, mental, nutritional, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, financial, social, or environmental).
  2. Demonstrate activities, techniques, or behaviors that promote intellectual or culture growth.
  3. Engage in communities (campus, regional, etc.) or participate in civic activities for the betterment of personal and public life.

Area A English Language Communication and Critical Thinking (9 semester units)

Students are required to take a minimum of nine semester units in communication in the English language, to include both oral communication (subarea A1) and written communication (subarea A2), and in critical thinking (subarea Area A3).

A1: Oral Communication (3 semester units) Ia, Ib, Ic, IVa
Students taking a course in fulfillment of subarea A1 will develop knowledge and understanding of the form, content, context, and effectiveness of oral communication. Students will develop proficiency in oral communication in English, examining communication from the rhetorical perspective and practicing reasoning and advocacy, organization, and accuracy. Students will practice the discovery, critical evaluation, and reporting of information, as well as reading and listening effectively. Coursework must include active participation and practice in oral communication in English including exploration, development, understanding, and use of visual communication media and skills.

A2: Written Communication (3 semester units) Ia, Ic, IVa
Students taking a course in fulfillment of subarea A2 will develop knowledge and understanding of the form, content, context, and effectiveness of written communication. Students will develop proficiency in written communication in English, examining communication from the rhetorical perspective and practicing reasoning and advocacy, organization, and accuracy. Students will practice the discovery, critical evaluation, and reporting of information, as well as reading and writing effectively. Coursework must include considerable active participation and practice in written communication in English.

A3: Critical Thinking (3 semester units) Ia, Ic, Id, IVb
In critical thinking courses, students will understand logic and its relation to language; elementary inductive and deductive processes, including an understanding of the formal and informal fallacies of language and thought; and the ability to distinguish matters of fact from issues of judgment or opinion. In A3 courses, students will develop the abilities to analyze, criticize, and advocate ideas; to reason inductively and deductively; and to reach well supported factual or judgmental conclusions.

Area B Scientific Inquiry and Quantitative Reasoning (12 semester units)

Instruction approved for fulfillment of this requirement is intended to develop knowledge of scientific theories, concepts, and data about living and non-living systems. Students will achieve an understanding and appreciation of scientific principles and the scientific method, as well as the potential limits of scientific endeavors and the value systems and ethics associated with human inquiry.

Students are required to fulfill each subarea B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5, as defined below. A student can satisfy the B3 requirement by either completing a B1 or B2 course with an integrated laboratory component or an independent laboratory course. Students shall complete the lower division requirements in Area B (1, 2, 3, and 4) before taking their upper division B5 course.

B1: Physical Sciences (3 semester units) Ia, Id, Ie, IIa
Courses in this area will allow students to develop knowledge of scientific theories, concepts, and data about non-living systems. Students will achieve an understanding and appreciation of scientific principles and the scientific method, as well as the potential limits of scientific endeavors and the value systems and ethics associated with human inquiry. This area will also require quantitative and critical reasoning skills. Courses in this area will be investigative and not purely descriptive or historical.Where applicable, scientific contributions from various cultures of the world will be included.

B2: Life Sciences (3 semester units) Ia, Id, Ie, IIa
Courses in this area will allow students to develop knowledge of scientific theories, concepts, and data about living systems. Students will achieve an understanding and appreciation of scientific principles and the scientific method, as well as the potential limits of scientific endeavors and the value systems and ethics associated with human inquiry. This area will also require quantitative and critical reasoning skills. Courses in this area will be investigative and not purely descriptive or historical. Where applicable, scientific contributions from various cultures of the world will be included.

B3: Laboratory Activity (0 semester unit) Ia, Ib, Id, Ie, IIa
Courses in this area will require the student to reinforce principles learned in either physical sciences or life sciences sub areas. A student can satisfy the B3 requirement by either completing a B1 or B2 course with an integrated laboratory component or an independent laboratory course. Courses in this area also include writing as an integral part of the process of learning and discovery.

B4: Mathematics/Quantitative Reasoning (3 semester units) Ia, Ie, IIa, IVb
Through courses in subarea B4 students shall demonstrate the abilities to reason quantitatively, practice computational skills, and explain and apply mathematical or quantitative reasoning concepts to solve problems. Courses in this subarea shall include a prerequisite reflective only of skills and knowledge required in the course.

Courses in this subarea will require the student to use basic mathematical skills to develop mathematical reasoning, investigative and problem-solving abilities, including applications from/to real life situations. Students will not only practice computational skills, but will also be able to explain and apply basic mathematical concepts and solve problems using quantitative methods. In addition to traditional mathematics, courses in subarea B4 may include computer science, personal finance, statistics or discipline-based mathematics or quantitative reasoning courses, for example.

B5: Science and Technology Synthesis (Upper division, 3 semester units) Ia, Ib, Ic, Id, Ie, IIa, IId
Courses in this area shall deal both with the relationship between science, technology, and civilization and with the effect science and technology have on culture and human values. Synthesis courses in this area are essentially integrative in nature, incorporating the application and generalization of basic scientific or quantitative knowledge from the foundational courses to real world or practical problems.
Students must complete the lower division GE requirements in Area A (A1, A2, and A3) and Area B (B1, B2, B3, and B4) before enrolling in the upper division B5 course. Courses satisfying the requirements for B5 may have prerequisites in specific disciplines included in Area B (not specific courses) as long as the total number of units required as prerequisites does not exceed the minimum number of units to satisfy the lower division GE requirement (e.g. only the first semester of a sequence can be required).

Area C Art and Humanities (12 semester units)

Courses in the traditional humanistic disciplines enable students to develop their intellect, imagination, and sensitivity. Instruction in these subareas will demonstrate the continuity between historical and contemporary life as well as the relationships among the arts, the humanistic disciplines, self and society. Courses will reflect the contributions to knowledge and civilization that have been made by both men and women, and by different cultural groups in the world. In this pursuit, students shall cultivate and refine their affective, cognitive, and physical faculties through studying great works of the human imagination. In their intellectual and subjective considerations, students will develop a better understanding of the interrelationship between themselves, the creative arts and the humanities in a variety of cultures. Cal Poly Pomona native Students students will complete at least are required to take one course from each subarea, C1, C2, and C3; and one additional course (3 units) from subarea C1 or C2. Area C pathway for transfer students will follow the standard EO 1100R policy.

C1: Visual and Performing Arts (3 semester units) Ia, IIb, IVb
Courses will enable students to experience and appreciate visual and performing arts in relation to the realms of creativity, imagination, visualization, and feeling that explore the meaning of what it is to be human. Courses shall include active participation in aesthetic and creative experience. Students will understand how disciplined, individual creativity and visualization could produce objects and models that are obviously useful or practical, and also clarify, intensify, and enlarge the human experience. Courses will provide a sense of the values that inform artistic expression and performance and their interrelationships with human society.

C2: Literature, Modern Languages, Philosophy and Civilization (3 semester units) Ia, Ic, Id, IIb, IIIa, IIIb, IVb
Literature and modern languages courses in this area will provide students with an appreciation of languages and literature, underscoring both the relationships between culture and language and the significance of literature in the interpretation of culture. Students in literature and foreign languages will better understand the implication of great creative writings and communicative customs and traditions of particular cultures. Instruction in these courses will deepen students' appreciation of enduring works of literature and of the contributions of diverse cultures to our literary and linguistic heritage. Courses in languages other than English shall not focus solely on skills acquisition but also contain a substantial cultural component. This may include literature, among other content.

Philosophy and civilization courses in this area will provide students with an understanding of the values that make a civilized and humane society possible. Courses will enable students to critically examine the philosophical ideas and theories around which different civilizations have been organized and explore the complex developments of those civilizations. In the study of philosophy, students will come to understand and appreciate the principles, methodologies, and thought processes employed in human inquiry. Courses should promote the capacity to make informed and responsible moral choices as well as encouraging a broad historical understanding.

C3: Arts and Humanities Synthesis (upper division, 3 semester units) Ia, Ib, Ic, Id, IIb, IId, IIIa
Courses in this area shall emphasize the humanistic or expressive aspects of culture. Synthesis offerings should provide temporal and cultural context that will illuminate contemporary thought and behavior-global, regional, and local - showing the bonds between the past, present, and future.

Students shall complete the lower division GE requirements in Area A1, A2, A3 and B4 and Area C (C1 and C2), before taking their upper division C3 course. Courses satisfying the requirements for C3 may have prerequisites that are GE approved courses in specific disciplines (not specific courses) as long as the total number of units required as prerequisites does not exceed the minimum number of units to satisfy the lower division GE requirement (e.g. only the first semester of a sequence can be required).

Area D Social Sciences (12 semester units)

Students will learn from courses in multiple disciplines that human social, political, and economic institutions as well as history and human behavior are inextricably interwoven. Through fulfillment of the Area D requirement, students will develop an understanding of problems and issues from the respective disciplinary perspectives and will examine issues in their contemporary as well as historical settings and in a variety of cultural contexts. Students will explore the principles, methodologies, value systems, and ethics employed in social scientific inquiry. Courses that emphasize skills development and professional preparation shall not be included in Area D. Students must complete at least two lower division courses in two different disciplines (i.e. the 3 lower division area D courses cannot be completed in one disciple). 

Students are required to take one course from each subarea, D1, D2, D3, and D4. Students who complete the IGE course sequence are exempt from this requirement since the IGE program by its very nature provides the necessary breadth. EO 1100 says in 2.2.6.2 campuses may include the United States History, Constitution, and American Ideals Requirement (Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations, Section 40404) in general education. This statute is met at Cal Poly Pomona by courses that satisfy these requirements as outlined in Executive Order 1061 and divided into D1 and D2 as follows:

D1: U.S. History and American Ideals (3 semester units) Ia, Ib, Ic, IIb, IIc, IIIa
The GE Subarea provides partial fulfillment of the United States History, Constitution, and American Ideals Requirement (Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations, Section 40404,) outlined in Executive Order 1061,Paragraph I, A as follows:
Any course or examination which addresses the historical development of American institutions and ideals must include all of the subject matter elements identified in the following subparagraphs of this paragraph. Nothing contained herein is intended to prescribe the total content or structure of any course.

1. Significant events covering a minimum time span of approximately one hundred years occurring in the entire area now included in the United States of America, including the relationships of regions within that area and with external regions and powers as appropriate to the understanding of those events within the United States during the period under study.
2. The role of major ethnic and social groups in such events and the contexts in which the events have occurred.
3. The events presented within a framework which illustrates the continuity of the American experience and its derivation from other cultures including consideration of three or more of the following: politics, economics, social movements, and geography.

D2: US Constitution and California Government (3 semester units) Ia, Ib, Ic, IIc, IIIb, IVc
The GE Subarea provides partial fulfillment of the United States History, Constitution, and American Ideals Requirement (Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations, Section 40404) as outlined in Executive Order 1061, Paragraph I, B as follows:
Any course or examination which addresses the Constitution of the United States, the operation of representative democratic government under that Constitution, and the process of California State and local government must address all of the subject matter elements identified in the following subparagraph of this paragraph. Nothing contained herein is intended to prescribe the total content or structure of any course.

1. The political philosophies of the framers of the Constitution and the nature and operation of United States political institutions and processes under that Constitution as amended and interpreted.
2. The rights and obligations of citizens in the political system established under the Constitution.
3. The Constitution of the State of California within the framework of evolution of Federal- State relations and the nature and processes of State and local government under that Constitution. Contemporary relationships of State and local government with the Federal government, the resolution of conflicts and the establishment of cooperative processes under the constitutions of both the State and nation, and the political processes involved.

D3: The Social Sciences: Principles, Methodologies, Value Systems, and Ethics (3 semester units) Ia, Ic, IIc, IIIa, IIIb, IVa
Courses in Subarea D3 will integrate critical thinking and analysis. Students will be able to generalize, draw comparisons, detect logical fallacies, and learn that human social, political, and economic institutions and behavior are inextricably interwoven. While the subject matter of each course will emphasize a particular discipline and content, each course should also demonstrate the interrelatedness of these subareas. Therefore, these courses shall include substantial multi-disciplinary coverage of issues so students can connect sometimes fragmented information and draw meaningful conclusions. Problems and issues in these sections should be examined in contemporary as well as historical contexts, and include significant global and cross cultural perspectives.

D4: Social Science Synthesis (upper division, 3 semester units): Ia, Ib, Ic, Id, IId, IIIa, IIIb
Courses in this area shall focus on either a deeper or broader understanding of a set of concepts and their application in the solution of a variety of specific social problems. Courses shall take a more integrative approach and examine the historical development and cross-cultural distribution of patterns of social behavior as well as different theories and approaches in the field.

Students shall complete the lower division GE requirements in A1, A2, A3 and B4 and Area D (D1, D2, and D3), before taking their upper division D4 course. Courses satisfying the requirements for D4 may have prerequisites that are GE approved courses in specific disciplines (not specific courses) as long as the total number of units required as prerequisites does not exceed the minimum number of units to satisfy the lower division GE requirement (e.g. only the first semester of a sequence can be required).

Area E Lifelong Learning and Self Development (3 semester units) Ia, IVa, IVb, IVc

The content of courses to fulfill Area E is designed to equip learners for lifelong understanding and development of themselves as integrated physiological, social, and psychological beings. Student learning in this area shall include selective consideration of content such as human behavior, sexuality, nutrition, physical and mental health, stress management, information literacy and student success strategies, social relationships and relationships with the environment, as well as implications of death and dying and avenues for lifelong learning. Physical activity may be included, provided that it is an integral part of the study elements described herein. Courses in this area, according to EO 1100, shall be lower division only.

General Education Meaningful Writing Component
All General Education requirements must include a meaningful writing component as defined by the Academic Senate in 2006:
Courses with a meaningful writing component must make use of written work to help students reflect upon ideas, analyze concepts, and explore relationships of concepts to one another. The written work must help students deepen their understanding of particular fields, enabling them to create meaning out of raw data and helping them express that meaning intelligibly to others. Written assignments must be structured to help students achieve specific course outcomes, and the students must receive feedback on their written work during - not solely at the end - of the [semester] of instruction.

Interdisciplinary Synthesis Courses

An interdisciplinary synthesis course integrates two or more of the Areas B, C, and D. Prior to taking one of these courses, students must complete all lower-division courses in Area A and at least two sub-areas from the areas being integrated by an interdisciplinary synthesis course.

Each interdisciplinary synthesis course can be used to satisfy the requirement in any one of the areas integrated. For example, a B5/D4 course satisfies either B5 or D4 (not both areas). Students must fulfill all three synthesis areas (science and technology, arts and humanities, and social sciences).

Interdisciplinary General Education

IGE is an alternative pattern to satisfy 21 units of the University GE requirements in areas A2, C1 and C2, D1 and D3, and Upper Division C3 or D4. Students ready for GE area A2 (category II) are eligible to enroll in IGE 1100  in the Fall. Students taking English Stretch can start IGE in fall with their A2 satisfied.

The Interdisciplinary General Education Program (IGE) provides an interdisciplinary undergraduate general education experience that prepares students to lead socially responsible, productive, and satisfying lives in a changing diverse world. IGE combines intellectual inquiry with creativity to provide a rich learning environment. Students enter IGE as a cohort and travel through the program together. It is an option for first-time freshmen, with the option to opt out after the first, second, or third years. IGE also offers a number of stand-alone Upper Division GE Synthesis Courses covering C3 and D4. Contact the IGE Department for more information.

You can find more information about the IGE Program on the IGE Program website.

The IGE Arts Package offers a set of theater, music, and other experiences that augment the curriculum and build the community.

FIRST YEAR

IGE 1100 Consciousness and Community (3)  

IGE 1200 Authority and Faith: Late Ancient and Medieval Worlds (3)  

SECOND/THIRD YEAR

IGE 2100 Empires, States, and Peoples: Cultural Contact and Exchange (3)  

IGE 2200 Encountering Difference: Culture and Power (3)  

IGE 2300 Ways of Doing: Culture, Society, and the Sciences (3)  

IGE 2400 Ways of Living: Local, Global, and Universal Challenges (3)  

THIRD/FOURTH YEAR

IGE 3100 Interdisciplinary Perspectives: Capstone Seminar (3)  

IGE students will take remaining GE courses from the current approved GE list to complete the total units required.

Additional Graduation Requirement CPP: American Cultural Perspectives

The American Cultural Perspectives is a graduation requirement, not a general education requirement. Courses satisfying this additional graduation requirement shall be indicated in the link below. This requirement will not constitute an additional unit load on the degree requirements of a student in any program. The courses that satisfy this requirement may be part of a student's GE program, major, or minor, or may be taken as electives. Senate Resolution AS-887-934/GE gives the GE Committee the responsibility to evaluate all courses (GE and Non-GE) submitted to satisfy this requirement.

To satisfy this requirement, a student must take at least one three-unit course that satisfies all of the following criteria:

• Introduce theoretical perspectives and non-western/non-traditional approaches for studying gender, ethnicity, and class;
• Include the study of at least one other marker of social difference, such as sexual orientation, religious affiliation, national origin, etc.;
• Cover at least two of the following socio-cultural groups: African Americans, Native Americans, Chicano/Latino Americans, Asian Americans, Pacific Islands Americans, Middle Eastern Americans, or European/White ethnic Americans;
• Address intra-cultural differences as well as inter-cultural commonalities. Differences may be examined by focusing on diverse cultural practices, environmental ethics, political histories, religious beliefs, or means of artistic expression.

Transfer Students and GE Certification

Community college transfer students should be aware that many courses on the Cal Poly Pomona General Education list are also major department entrance or prerequisite requirements and will still have to be taken to meet degree requirements. Therefore, even if they may be certified by their community colleges as having met all (or most) CSU lower division general education requirements, or have met GE requirements prior to change of major, they may need to take additional courses to satisfy prerequisites for the major. For example, students may have met the quantitative reasoning requirement by taking a trigonometry course at the community college, or at Cal Poly Pomona, and be so certified. This will not meet the calculus requirement for engineering, which also meets the Cal Poly Pomona GE quantitative reasoning requirement. Calculus will still have to be taken. Such "excess" coursework will be given as "elective credit." Some transfer students without a complete GE certification may be partially certified by their community colleges as having met the CSU General Education quantitative reasoning requirement with coursework which does not meet the Cal Poly Pomona Mathematics proficiency requirement. Such students will also have to take coursework to meet this graduation requirement.

Transfer students may satisfy CSU lower division General Education requirements through certification of courses that satisfy the CSU General Education-Breadth Requirements or the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC). Contact your community college counselor for more details.